Should I unfollow everyone on twitter?

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Over the last few months, probably in combination with the huge increase in twitters profile and brand, many of the longest established and respected users on twitter have been rethinking their methods and usage of twitter and how they interact with the followers they have for a variety of reasons.

Why Unfollow everyone on Twitter?

The reoccurring theme for Chris Brogan and Darren Rowse here is something akin to spam, although to wholly class it as spam is a bit of a sweeping statement. Its more of a user error I believe, or basically a lack of understanding about how an action will affect the recipient, in this case, how a percentage of people don’t realise the effect they are having on Chris or Darren by using other services that they personally see little or no value in and which take away from their ability to use twitter effectively or communicate in a method that suits them.

By aiming to be fair to people who followed them they proceeded to return that favour to show that they value this act and appreciate it and are willing to open the lines of communication further it basically sounded the all clear for DMs to come racing in about all and nothing.

Rather than respecting the fact that they would have access to these people on a private level their followers have inadvertently abused it or not really realised the privilege they have thus forcing Chris Brogan and Darren Rowse to seriously consider the same actions as Jim Connolly and Seth Simonds.

So what did they do wrong?

Nothing. They did what they thought was best, remember Chris and Darren haven’t made any solid decisions yet but Seth and Jim where basically forced to take the step of reverting to zero, not something they enjoyed at all I assure you, because they simply could not communicate with people or where shifting though so much irrelevant info they where missing the important stuff.

What a terrible waste and if the Chris and Darren decided to take this course they will surely face some consequences and strife if they make the decision but little or indeed no other option is available to them it seems.

Personally I would support them 100% if they deemed this course of action the only viable option and it would not stop me from continuing to follow them but make your own decisions after you read their thoughts, these are their stories.

Should I unfollow everyone on twitter?Jim Connolly

First up was @JimConnolly. Jim explains why he made the decision to unfollow about 20,000 followers and begin again.

*Jim unfollowed everyone AND removed all his followers as well effectively starting from scratch 100%, rather than keeping his follower count, something he has clarified in the comments and which I felt should be mentioned here.

Twitter and Me.

Should I unfollow everyone on twitter?Seth Simonds

2nd came @SethSimonds. Seth wrote this post about making the decision to unfollow nearly 45 thousand followers on Twitter.

Why I Unfollowed Everybody on Twitter

Should I unfollow everyone on twitter?Chris Brogan

Next up is @ChrisBrogan. Chris hasn’t made the decision to unfollow everyone, yet. But is seriously considering the option it seems. These posts came about from Chris over the last few weeks.

Twitter MUST Stop the Spam Use of APIs Now

and

Quid Pro No

Should I unfollow everyone on twitter?Darren Rowse, Problogger

Finally, even Darren Rowse, or as he is more commonly known, @ProBlogger has hinted at his frustration publicly on twitter in these few tweets recently due to a deluge of Direct Messages that are of absolutely no value to him or which cause distraction.

Should I unfollow everyone on twitter?Heres the URL from the Tweet: http://twitpic.com/cb6y4

Should I unfollow everyone on twitter?
Should I unfollow everyone on twitter?

This raises another question, in my mind, of all those other twitter users out there who have 10′s of 1000`s of followers, if not more, who use twitter in a dffernet capacity to the guys mentioned in this post but rather, use it as a promotional platform based around numbers.

Are they “doing it wrong?”.

Probably not, that’s the way they want to do it and those that follow them seem to accept that but on the flip side, none of them seem to mind or worry about actually making personal connections with people or building networks or relationships. Its a list and that’s all it is but if it works for them then that’s fine!

What would you do?

What would you do in this situation?  Would you stick it out and continue or make the decision to unfollow and begin again?  Maybe you would consider doing something else entirely?

*UPDATE*

It seems that things are happening a little quicker than I thought. I just read this post on Jim Connolly’s blog with more of the “big players” on twitter making the same decision to reset their follower counts to zero.

Scoble, Twitter and the wisdom of the crowd!

It looks like the times and attitudes in social media are changing again and dramatically so.

  • Anonymous

    Hey Justin,

    Add to all this Leo over at Zenhabits saying that he’s moved away from Email to use Twitter as his primary form of communication!

    In the end, I think every user needs to make a personal decision as to how Twitter will best meet his/her needs and act toward that optimization.

    Always interesting to see what happens. Thanks!

    • http://www.justinparks.com Justin Parks

      Absolutely Seth. I cant believe Leo is only using Twitter though! I still think Email is essential for me to add depth but hell, if it works for him then I can only be jealous really!

      Definitely will be interesting to see how this pans out.

  • Jim Connolly

    Interesting Post Justin,As Seth rightly says, it’s very much an individual thing. The increasing number of high profile users unfollowing everyone is, in my opinion, directly linked to the insane flood of DM crap you receive. This is something Chris Brogan is very hot on right now, as you mentioned in your post.By yhe way I DID NOT unfollow everyone, like all the other examples. I eset my account to zero followers / zero following. These guys kept all their followers – I started again from scratch.

    • http://www.justinparks.com Justin Parks

      Hi Jim, Post rectified to clarify that point about starting from scratch on followers and following. Thanks for pointing out and it is an important point to make.

      I think the major point here is something akin to the post you wrote yourself. What started out as a general, polite consensus on reciprocating a follower by following back has proven to be unmanageable and in the end a hindrance rather than a help.

      Its like giving out your private phone number to every cold caller on the planet it seems and not being able to use the phone.

      Such a pity really.

  • http://northoftheweb.com joe_carney

    I’ve done this recently too, for various reasons. At first, I wanted to see what sort of information I could gain from having a Twitter stream following about 5,000 accounts. I found it to be information overload. Twitter recommends about 2,000 (hence the 10% follow limit) and I’ve found this to be about the best. You can refresh and still catch a lot of information before it disappears. I’m now following only 626 and will build it back up to about 1,500 over the next few weeks…

    I’ve found Twitter is used in a number of ways. For me, it is about finding quality links from quality Twitter accounts. I use my website (http://tweetpromote.com / blatant plug i know) to find these accounts.

    Don’t be afraid to stop following a lot of accounts. Some will complain and stop following back. There loss not yours.

    Incidentally, I follow @justinparks, which I class as a quality account ;)

    Keep up the good work, always a pleasure to read :)

    • http://www.justinparks.com Justin Parks

      Thanks for chipping in Joe especially with another first hand view of how it can be done.

      Also I like the “Incidentally, I follow @justinparks, which I class as a quality account ;)”, dont be shy, more of thats fine by me Joe! :P

  • sethsimonds

    Hey Justin,

    Add to all this Leo over at Zenhabits saying that he's moved away from Email to use Twitter as his primary form of communication!

    In the end, I think every user needs to make a personal decision as to how Twitter will best meet his/her needs and act toward that optimization.

    Always interesting to see what happens. Thanks!

  • http://www.justinparks.com justinparks

    Absolutely Seth. I cant believe Leo is only using Twitter though! I still think Email is essential for me to add depth but hell, if it works for him then I can only be jealous really!

    Definitely will be interesting to see how this pans out.

  • Jim Connolly

    Interesting Post Justin,

    As Seth rightly says, it's very much an individual thing. The increasing number of high profile users unfollowing everyone is, in my opinion, directly linked to the insane flood of DM crap you receive. This is something Chris Brogan is very hot on right now, as you mentioned in your post.

    By yhe way I DID NOT unfollow everyone, like all the other examples. I eset my account to zero followers / zero following. These guys kept all their followers – I started again from scratch.

  • http://www.justinparks.com justinparks

    Hi Jim, Post rectified to clarify that point about starting from scratch on followers and following. Thanks for pointing out and it is an important point to make.

    I think the major point here is something akin to the post you wrote yourself. What started out as a general, polite consensus on reciprocating a follower by following back has proven to be unmanageable and in the end a hindrance rather than a help.

    Its like giving out your private phone number to every cold caller on the planet it seems and not being able to use the phone.

    Such a pity really.

  • http://twitter.com/joe_carney joe_carney

    I've done this recently too, for various reasons. At first, I wanted to see what sort of information I could gain from having a Twitter stream following about 5,000 accounts. I found it to be information overload. Twitter recommends about 2,000 (hence the 10% follow limit) and I've found this to be about the best. You can refresh and still catch a lot of information before it disappears. I'm now following only 626 and will build it back up to about 1,500 over the next few weeks…

    I've found Twitter is used in a number of ways. For me, it is about finding quality links from quality Twitter accounts. I use my website (http://tweetpromote.com / blatant plug i know) to find these accounts.

    Don't be afraid to stop following a lot of accounts. Some will complain and stop following back. There loss not yours.

    Incidentally, I follow @justinparks, which I class as a quality account ;)

    Keep up the good work, always a pleasure to read :)

  • http://www.justinparks.com justinparks

    Thanks for chipping in Joe especially with another first hand view of how it can be done.

    Also I like the “Incidentally, I follow @justinparks, which I class as a quality account ;)”, dont be shy, more of thats fine by me Joe! :P

  • http://www.ChrisEFrost.com Chris Frost

    I can definately see why people do this and may choose to do it myself one day.

    Currently I only follow 110 people and already find that this is sometimes an overload. I’ve never chosen, nor felt the need, to reciprocate with a follow if someone follows me, and as I have mine set to private, it makes it even more managable.

    Sadly I’m finding more and more people using Twitter as a means to hold a short conversation with someone. This, a few months ago, would have happened in MSN or any other IM.

    It’s these people, along with the those that use it purely as self-promotions (or constant RT of others news) that I’m finding I’m filtering out slowly. How on earth you could use Twitter in place of email, I really don’t know.

    • http://www.justinparks.com Justin Parks

      Again it depends on how you use twitter Chris, and with the guys mentioned in the article they where all above 20 k followers and following, if not alot more so 110 seems quite manageable!

      For me, TweetDeck has been the saving grace, while I only follow 1000 or so people the groups function really helps me to maintain control of the information by dividng the stream up enoguh so I dont miss tweets that I would consider useful.

      In regards using twitter instead of email, I wish! Sounds good in theory but its just not at the stage where email can be replaced for me either and I don’t think that’s going to happen for the majority any time soon (or ever).

      • http://www.ChrisEFrost.com Chris Frost

        I hear ya! However it doesn’t depend on how I use twitter, it surely depends on how the people I follow use twitter?

        The 100 people I follow may well generate a heap load more Tweets than the 1000 you follow? All I’m saying is that I think it’s got to the stage where being selective is key to making the most of Twitter.

        Twitter for me is a way of getting snippets of information from people I have no daily contact with (in a business sense!). This is one reason I don’t auto-follow back. For networking purposes I’ll continue to stick with LinkedIn for now.

  • http://ariherzog.com Ari Herzog

    Do what you want to do, not what others think you should do.

    • http://www.justinparks.com Justin Parks

      What like spam, insult and annoy people? Seriously? Im kidding, I get your point. (I think).

      • http://ariherzog.com Ari Herzog

        Fact is if you’re not authentic in your actions and transparent in your motives, you’ll be drawn out. The moment you do anything because someone thinks you should do it and not because you or your friends think you should, you’ll be drawn out.

  • http://techshots.net Jaremy

    Honestly, I’m torn on the subject. On the one hand, I believe that by unfollowing everyone, you’re going back on somewhat of a social contract you’ve made with your userbase (if, up until that point, you’ve made it clear that you’re following back everyone who follows you). I think that if you’re focused on truly engaging your community, not following back is closing off a stream of conversation (in the same way that not posting your email, or not allowing comments might).

    That said, I do not follow people that I do not know (or am not interested in) and relish the fact that the only DMs I get are genuine. Unless Twitter releases a better way to spam control DMs (and maybe even a better DM system), unfollowing is not a bad option.

    I will say this, tools like TweetDeck and Seesmic make it possible to follow a great deal of people while only “listening” to a few, but that might just defeat the purpose anyway. If Twitter is just a numbers game of who has so many followers, and you are only choosing to follow based on the self-centered hope that you’ll be followed back, you’re doing it wrong anyway.

    • http://www.justinparks.com Justin Parks

      Some valid points Jaremy. To address your points however I think that the “follow me and I will follow” back attitude was born of the desire for social media (or twitter in this case) to actually work and is based on a relationship of mutual respect.

      A follow back opens the door to DMs, a private method of communicating that isnt available until both parites reciprocate. Based on mutual respect this wouldn’t be a problem but this respect has been broken when the DMs become spam and the privacy/etiquette is ignored.

      Like I mentioned I think alot of people do not realise the effect of these private DMs that come into someone’s account, especially one with as many followers as Chris and Darren currently have. It would really drive me insane if it happened to me.

      Your point is about the “social contract” that possibly caused this in the first place but when it gets to the stage that the application becomes useless because of a proportion of users forcing your hand then little or no options exist except to say “Mistake made, learning all the time, lets start again”.

      I dont agree though about the about a lack of follow back causing a closing off of a conversation stream. @ still works perfectly well in the case of people not following you back and we do tend to forget this.

      Also in regards using tweetdeck to follow large numbers of people while listening to a few I consider this is a way to assess if someone is possibly open to more communication as im not sure if they are of interest or not based on a few tweets or having read over a bio. This actually allows the lines of communication to remain open for longer.

      Some good points Jaremy, definitely something for me to chew on.

  • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

    Over the last three days, I’ve already received 5 people asking me why I don’t follow them, and whether I’m some kind of snob. 3 days. I JUST stopped auto-following, and five different people asked me if I’m a snob.

    I followed back because people expect reciprocal informational sharing relationships on Twitter.

    Thanks to spam and the platform’s inabillity to weed it out, I’m locking down.

    • http://www.justinparks.com Justin Parks

      Thanks for taking the time to comment Chris.Snob? Are you sure you want to a “reciprocal informational sharing relationship” with people who’s first reaction to you on not getting what they want is to call you a snob? I wouldn’t.Locking down? Not familiar with the term or what you mean exactly.

    • http://www.twitter.com/unmarketing unmarketing

      Same here Chris. I recently stopped the auto follow-back, and ppl are asking why I don’t like them. Oye…

      Following back isn’t a courtesy or an obligation, it’s a choice.

      I made the mistake of following all back and now since I follow 30k, some people get a wee bit upset when they don’t make the 30k cut!

  • http://twitter.com/frostiecuk Chris Frost

    I can definately see why people do this and may choose to do it myself one day.

    Currently I only follow 110 people and already find that this is sometimes an overload. I've never chosen, nor felt the need, to reciprocate with a follow if someone follows me, and as I have mine set to private, it makes it even more managable.

    Sadly I'm finding more and more people using Twitter as a means to hold a short conversation with someone. This, a few months ago, would have happened in MSN or any other IM.

    It's these people, along with the those that use it purely as self-promotions (or constant RT of others news) that I'm finding I'm filtering out slowly. How on earth you could use Twitter in place of email, I really don't know.

  • http://www.justinparks.com justinparks

    Again it depends on how you use twitter Chris, and with the guys mentioned in the article they where all above 20 k followers and following, if not alot more so 110 seems quite manageable!

    For me, TweetDeck has been the saving grace, while I only follow 1000 or so people the groups function really helps me to maintain control of the information by dividng the stream up enoguh so I dont miss tweets that I would consider useful.

    In regards using twitter instead of email, I wish! Sounds good in theory but its just not at the stage where email can be replaced for me either and I don't think that's going to happen for the majority any time soon (or ever).

  • http://ariherzog.com Ari Herzog

    Do what you want to do, not what others think you should do.

  • http://www.justinparks.com justinparks

    What like spam, insult and annoy people? Seriously? Im kidding, I get your point. (I think).

  • http://ariherzog.com Ari Herzog

    Fact is if you're not authentic in your actions and transparent in your motives, you'll be drawn out. The moment you do anything because someone thinks you should do it and not because you or your friends think you should, you'll be drawn out.

  • http://techshots.net Jaremy

    Honestly, I'm torn on the subject. On the one hand, I believe that by unfollowing everyone, you're going back on somewhat of a social contract you've made with your userbase (if, up until that point, you've made it clear that you're following back everyone who follows you). I think that if you're focused on truly engaging your community, not following back is closing off a stream of conversation (in the same way that not posting your email, or not allowing comments might).

    That said, I do not follow people that I do not know (or am not interested in) and relish the fact that the only DMs I get are genuine. Unless Twitter releases a better way to spam control DMs (and maybe even a better DM system), unfollowing is not a bad option.

    I will say this, tools like TweetDeck and Seesmic make it possible to follow a great deal of people while only “listening” to a few, but that might just defeat the purpose anyway. If Twitter is just a numbers game of who has so many followers, and you are only choosing to follow based on the self-centered hope that you'll be followed back, you're doing it wrong anyway.

  • http://www.justinparks.com justinparks

    Some valid points Jaremy. To address your points however I think that the “follow me and I will follow” back attitude was born of the desire for social media (or twitter in this case) to actually work and is based on a relationship of mutual respect.

    A follow back opens the door to DMs, a private method of communicating that isnt available until both parites reciprocate. Based on mutual respect this wouldn't be a problem but this respect has been broken when the DMs become spam and the privacy/etiquette is ignored.

    Like I mentioned I think alot of people do not realise the effect of these private DMs that come into someone's account, especially one with as many followers as Chris and Darren currently have. It would really drive me insane if it happened to me.

    Your point is about the “social contract” that possibly caused this in the first place but when it gets to the stage that the application becomes useless because of a proportion of users forcing your hand then little or no options exist except to say “Mistake made, learning all the time, lets start again”.

    I dont agree though about the about a lack of follow back causing a closing off of a conversation stream. @ still works perfectly well in the case of people not following you back and we do tend to forget this.

    Also in regards using tweetdeck to follow large numbers of people while listening to a few I consider this is a way to assess if someone is possibly open to more communication as im not sure if they are of interest or not based on a few tweets or having read over a bio. This actually allows the lines of communication to remain open for longer.

    Some good points Jaremy, definitely something for me to chew on.

  • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

    Over the last three days, I've already received 5 people asking me why I don't follow them, and whether I'm some kind of snob. 3 days. I JUST stopped auto-following, and five different people asked me if I'm a snob.

    I followed back because people expect reciprocal informational sharing relationships on Twitter.

    Thanks to spam and the platform's inabillity to weed it out, I'm locking down.

    • http://www.twitter.com/unmarketing unmarketing

      Same here Chris. I recently stopped the auto follow-back, and ppl are asking why I don’t like them. Oye…

      Following back isn’t a courtesy or an obligation, it’s a choice.

      I made the mistake of following all back and now since I follow 30k, some people get a wee bit upset when they don’t make the 30k cut!

  • http://www.justinparks.com justinparks

    Thanks for taking the time to comment Chris.

    Snob? Are you sure you want to a “reciprocal informational sharing relationship” with people who's first reaction to you on not getting what they want is to call you a snob? I wouldn't.

    Locking down? Not familiar with the term Chris sorry or what you mean exactly.

  • Anonymous

    Perhaps I am a little confused. We all have our reasons to be on twitter. We have our message and our story that we are trying to tell. Now, I obviously have way less followers then all of you but there are tools now that can help organize our lists?? No? Is the main problem those that are DMing you? If so, why are you not just unfollowing them instead of silencing all of “our” view points and tweets? Am I not understanding because I am not in your situation? @Elizabeth_N

  • Anonymous

    Perhaps I am a little confused. We all have our reasons to be on twitter. We have our message and our story that we are trying to tell. Now, I obviously have way less followers then all of you but there are tools now that can help organize our lists?? No? Is the main problem those that are DMing you? If so, why are you not just unfollowing them instead of silencing all of “our” view points and tweets? Am I not understanding because I am not in your situation? @Elizabeth_N

    • http://www.justinparks.com Justin Parks

      Maybe Chris Brogan’s reply helps clarify the situation he faces personally. Im not as nice as him though and I would unfollow anyone who had that attitude without a second thought, but like you say, that’s how I use it and that’s just me.

  • Anonymous

    I would go with what sethsimonds said “In the end, I think every user needs to make a personal decision as to how Twitter will best meet his/her needs and act toward that optimization”. I follow only a list of website feeds & a very few authenticated & trustful blogs & its users like yours!!

  • Anonymous

    I would go with what sethsimonds said “In the end, I think every user needs to make a personal decision as to how Twitter will best meet his/her needs and act toward that optimization”. I follow only a list of website feeds & a very few authenticated & trustful blogs & its users like yours!!

  • http://www.twitter.com/unmarketing unmarketing

    Great post as usual Justin.

    Here’s where my thinking process has gone up until recently:

    I started on Twitter like most, getting notifications everytime someone followed me. With loads of glee, I’d click over to their profile to check them out and also see if I wanted to follow them back.

    That worked great up until I got into my full-blown “Twitter is my crack dealer” level addiction and started getting more than 50 followers a day.

    So I then had a choice. Did I not follow anyone back and become the Twitter Diva, or Twiva cause that sounds annoying enough to use. Or, do I auto-follow back everyone, giving them the benefit of the doubt that since they followed me, they were just crazy enough to have something interesting to say and I should by default follow them back.

    i went with the latter, and up it went and got up to around 30k both following me and me following.

    And them the spammers came…. and filled have the stream with crapcakes and pitches… and then even worse… the auto-dm’s came

    and the THE WORST OF THEM ALL

    Dm’s generated by “games’ asking me to join the mafia, spymaster, and sending gifts, like all of a sudden Twitter turned into this MySpace/Facebook hybrid 12 year old girl demographic marketplace.

    And now I’m starting to despise it, yet I created this monster by auto-following back.

    If someone can come up with a program that can identify everyone I’ve ever replied to or retweeted (engaged with) (or vice versa) and I can unfollow everyone else, I would be forever grateful.

  • http://www.twitter.com/unmarketing unmarketing

    Great post as usual Justin.

    Here’s where my thinking process has gone up until recently:

    I started on Twitter like most, getting notifications everytime someone followed me. With loads of glee, I’d click over to their profile to check them out and also see if I wanted to follow them back.

    That worked great up until I got into my full-blown “Twitter is my crack dealer” level addiction and started getting more than 50 followers a day.

    So I then had a choice. Did I not follow anyone back and become the Twitter Diva, or Twiva cause that sounds annoying enough to use. Or, do I auto-follow back everyone, giving them the benefit of the doubt that since they followed me, they were just crazy enough to have something interesting to say and I should by default follow them back.

    i went with the latter, and up it went and got up to around 30k both following me and me following.

    And them the spammers came…. and filled have the stream with crapcakes and pitches… and then even worse… the auto-dm’s came

    and the THE WORST OF THEM ALL

    Dm’s generated by “games’ asking me to join the mafia, spymaster, and sending gifts, like all of a sudden Twitter turned into this MySpace/Facebook hybrid 12 year old girl demographic marketplace.

    And now I’m starting to despise it, yet I created this monster by auto-following back.

    If someone can come up with a program that can identify everyone I’ve ever replied to or retweeted (engaged with) (or vice versa) and I can unfollow everyone else, I would be forever grateful.

    • http://www.justinparks.com Justin Parks

      Again its the old bug bear of spam that seems to be the root of the problem here when we boil it down to the nitty gritty. Im not sure if we can ever get rid of it entirely (dear god I wish) but I would hope that we can make it harder for it to happen, or at least twitter could.

      The DMs about stupid stuff are annoying. I get them to and usually let the DMer know that its a bit crap, sometimes they dont even realise that its happened and usually the put a stop to it right away, probably becasue they have been on the receiving end themselves of something that operates in the same fashion.

      They are a pet hate of mine as well though and really there’s not an excuse for them, what the hell do I want the “open my egg and get a gift” crap for and why would I want to send you one back, do you seriously want me to?

  • http://www.seocompany.ca/ bobmutch

    If you have over 2000 followers I think the best way to deal with to follow or not to follow is to do both. Have two accounts and where one auto posts in the other. One, called the list, you follow people just so they will follow you, you don’t read their posts or respond to there DMs or @s.

    If you have a huge list like over 10,000 and you want to communicate with the followers so they will be more dedicated hire some one to respond to the @s and DMs.

    On the other account you only follow the people you want to read and make your tweets protected and by invitation only.

  • http://www.seocompany.ca/ bobmutch

    If you have over 2000 followers I think the best way to deal with to follow or not to follow is to do both. Have two accounts and where one auto posts in the other. One, called the list, you follow people just so they will follow you, you don’t read their posts or respond to there DMs or @s.

    If you have a huge list like over 10,000 and you want to communicate with the followers so they will be more dedicated hire some one to respond to the @s and DMs.

    On the other account you only follow the people you want to read and make your tweets protected and by invitation only.

    • http://www.justinparks.com Justin Parks

      I see the logic here but I like having the one account. Of course this problem I posted about hasnt affected me really, or at least, not to the same extent as those mentioned but I would think that having more than one account is just adding extra work for alot of people unless its essential.

      I would guess I would find myself boucning between mutliple accounts and end up pulling my hair out.

  • http://twitter.com/sandyssn Sandeep Swaminathan

    I totally agree with “SethSimonds” statement “In the end, I think every user needs to make a personal decision as to how Twitter will best meet his/her needs and act toward that optimization”. Its all upto you to decide. I follow a list of news feeds & some professionals bloggers! Very particular in that! And I just hit the “block button” mercilessly at my following spammers too! Followers count has nothing to do!

  • http://twitter.com/sandyssn Sandeep Swaminathan

    I totally agree with “SethSimonds” statement “In the end, I think every user needs to make a personal decision as to how Twitter will best meet his/her needs and act toward that optimization”. Its all upto you to decide. I follow a list of news feeds & some professionals bloggers! Very particular in that! And I just hit the “block button” mercilessly at my following spammers too! Followers count has nothing to do!

    • http://www.justinparks.com Justin Parks

      Im with ya there.

  • http://twitter.com/gsp100677 Gsp

    I don’t have that many followers, and am trying to check the tweetstream of every person who follows me individually before deciding whether to follow back or not (instead of auto-following back) – not just to weed out spam accounts, but keep my home stream interesting – it prevents the main stream of tweets I follow from becoming meaningless.

    However, the maintenance overhead is already becoming overwhelming.

    Regarding people like Darren Rowse, etc. – would it be worth considering individually unfollowing people as and when they spam DM, and setting up an auto-response (is there a 3rd party tool that can do this), that asks people ot limit DMs to a specified preferred context?

    Perhaps these are growing pains since Twitter is still relatively new, and the best long term solutions are going to come in the form of more rich features from 3rd party apps like TweetDeck, etc?

  • http://twitter.com/gsp100677 Gsp

    I don’t have that many followers, and am trying to check the tweetstream of every person who follows me individually before deciding whether to follow back or not (instead of auto-following back) – not just to weed out spam accounts, but keep my home stream interesting – it prevents the main stream of tweets I follow from becoming meaningless.

    However, the maintenance overhead is already becoming overwhelming.

    Regarding people like Darren Rowse, etc. – would it be worth considering individually unfollowing people as and when they spam DM, and setting up an auto-response (is there a 3rd party tool that can do this), that asks people ot limit DMs to a specified preferred context?

    Perhaps these are growing pains since Twitter is still relatively new, and the best long term solutions are going to come in the form of more rich features from 3rd party apps like TweetDeck, etc?

    • http://www.justinparks.com Justin Parks

      Im in the same boat, or have been Gsp. I manually follow back and the admin is really time consuming to the point that Im weeks behind.

      Im not sure if people are following me now then when I do not follow back immediately they are also unfollowing, and Im not to bothered to be honest. If they cant stick around, @ me a few times and say hello, we it would have been pointless me following them in the first place and opening the door to the potential DM spam.

  • http://socialmediainbusiness.co.uk/ Chris

    Old news really.

    I unfollowed all my followers numbered @ about 5k at the time, and started from scratch around feb 09 time.

    Wonderfully refreshing experience, I’m back up to 7k again, but a completely different echo chamber had been created.

    It’s not cut and dry though, depends entirely on the needs of the user / business.

    Cleaning any list is productive, right?

    • http://www.justinparks.com Justin Parks

      Glad that worked out for you Chris.

  • http://twitter.com/frostiecuk Chris Frost

    I hear ya! However it doesn't depend on how I use twitter, it surely depends on how the people I follow use twitter?

    The 100 people I follow may well generate a heap load more Tweets than the 1000 you follow? All I'm saying is that I think it's got to the stage where being selective is key to making the most of Twitter.

    Twitter for me is a way of getting snippets of information from people I have no daily contact with (in a business sense!). This is one reason I don't auto-follow back. For networking purposes I'll continue to stick with LinkedIn for now.

  • http://WhiteHatCrew.com/ AntoneRoundy

    I think email spam has proven conclusively that it’s naive to expect everyone in the world to play nice. Twitter isn’t a magical utopia where everybody socializes by the rules. You can wish that it were and mourn the fact that it’s not, but it’s not. So let’s get over it quickly and get back to living in the real world.

    Even back in the real world, like Chris Frost commented above, even following 110 people can be overwhelming if you’re REALLY following them (and if you’re not, is “following” them really good manners or more of a lie?)

    In a post I wrote a few days ago about how auto-DMs are not the root cause of people’s problems on Twitter, I listed all the reasons I could think of for following people (good and bad): http://whitehatcrew.com/blog/twitter-auto-dms-are-not-the-problem/

    It seems to me that there are more practical ways to accomplish the things people try to accomplish by following thousands, and I don’t see any point trying to force Twitter into a mold that would make it a better tool for those purposes.

    • http://www.justinparks.com Justin Parks

      Your right, twitters not a magical utopia. For me the block and unfollow are there for a reason. I fight every urge to use them but sometimes it just has to be done.

  • http://socialmediainbusiness.co.uk/ Chris

    Old news really.

    I unfollowed all my followers numbered @ about 5k at the time, and started from scratch around feb 09 time.

    Wonderfully refreshing experience, I'm back up to 7k again, but a completely different echo chamber had been created.

    It's not cut and dry though, depends entirely on the needs of the user / business.

    Cleaning any list is productive, right?

  • http://twitter.com/TiaraHotels Tiara Hotels Resorts

    Hi Justin,

    I haven’t done anything like this before, preciselly because I “check” my followers list every 15 days. Last time I did it, I’ve unfollowed at least 200 tweeps.

    My criteria are basicaly the time of the last post , number of posts and interaction with the profile.

    Cheers,

    Nuno Valinhas

    • http://www.justinparks.com Justin Parks

      Your using it the way you wish and it seems to be working well for you. Kudos Nuno, y perfecto!

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  • http://www.justinparks.com justinparks

    Maybe Chris Brogan's reply helps clarify the situation he faces personally. Im not as nice as him though and I would unfollow anyone who had that attitude without a second thought, but like you say, that's how I use it and that's just me.

  • http://WhiteHatCrew.com/ AntoneRoundy

    I think email spam has proven conclusively that it's naive to expect everyone in the world to play nice. Twitter isn't a magical utopia where everybody socializes by the rules. You can wish that it were and mourn the fact that it's not, but it's not. So let's get over it quickly and get back to living in the real world.

    Even back in the real world, like Chris Frost commented above, even following 110 people can be overwhelming if you're REALLY following them (and if you're not, is “following” them really good manners or more of a lie?)

    In a post I wrote a few days ago about how auto-DMs are not the root cause of people's problems on Twitter, I listed all the reasons I could think of for following people (good and bad): http://whitehatcrew.com/blog/twitter-auto-dms-a

    It seems to me that there are more practical ways to accomplish the things people try to accomplish by following thousands, and I don't see any point trying to force Twitter into a mold that would make it a better tool for those purposes.

  • http://www.jakejordan.me/ baldjake

    I prefer to keep my follow list small and efficient.

    The best routine I’ve found so far is to follow back people who interact with me more than once. This way I know there is:

    1. a warm body
    2. an opinion
    3. INTERACTION!!!

    I’m from the 1000 loyal follower camp, as opposed to 10,000 mixed bag followers. Quality over quantity is the lens I look through when making these decisions.

  • http://www.jakejordan.me/ baldjake

    I prefer to keep my follow list small and efficient.

    The best routine I’ve found so far is to follow back people who interact with me more than once. This way I know there is:

    1. a warm body
    2. an opinion
    3. INTERACTION!!!

    I’m from the 1000 loyal follower camp, as opposed to 10,000 mixed bag followers. Quality over quantity is the lens I look through when making these decisions.

    • http://www.justinparks.com Justin Parks

      I like that list, its REAL.

  • http://ekinci.tumblr.com Ky Ekinci

    @AlexisNeely did the same thing on twitter. She unfollowed everybody so bravely, but also so gracefully: Notifying everyone with plenty of notice and asking to reconnect. True follower are connecting with her again, and she’s following them back. She may have lost some, but weren’t they “non-existing / lost followers” to begin with.

    This was the first I saw this done, and appreciated it.

    Nice thing about twitter is that people are free to do what they like. Obviously there are ways to deal with what I would call excessive “follower noise” (which really occurs when you go past few hundred followers).

    Under our twitter handle @OfficeDivvy we have about 18,000 followers, and we’re subject to same frustration of “follower noise” and time to time question how to deal with the “not so genuine user” we may have followed early on (for which we do few things to).

    It’s hard to anticipate the reasons for unfollowing all at this stage of Office Divvy being on twitter only a few months and still under (even though slightly) 20,000 follower level.

    The whole argument of twitter to hide the follower numbers is a proposition to deal with this situation. But I wonder if that would impact twitter’s popularity.

    You never know, you may see us added to this list one of these days.

    A tip of the hat to all genuine twitter personalities…

    Ky Ekinci
    Co-Founder
    Office Divvy
    ___________
    on twitter: @OfficeDivvy

  • http://ekinci.tumblr.com Ky Ekinci

    @AlexisNeely did the same thing on twitter. She unfollowed everybody so bravely, but also so gracefully: Notifying everyone with plenty of notice and asking to reconnect. True follower are connecting with her again, and she’s following them back. She may have lost some, but weren’t they “non-existing / lost followers” to begin with.

    This was the first I saw this done, and appreciated it.

    Nice thing about twitter is that people are free to do what they like. Obviously there are ways to deal with what I would call excessive “follower noise” (which really occurs when you go past few hundred followers).

    Under our twitter handle @OfficeDivvy we have about 18,000 followers, and we’re subject to same frustration of “follower noise” and time to time question how to deal with the “not so genuine user” we may have followed early on (for which we do few things to).

    It’s hard to anticipate the reasons for unfollowing all at this stage of Office Divvy being on twitter only a few months and still under (even though slightly) 20,000 follower level.

    The whole argument of twitter to hide the follower numbers is a proposition to deal with this situation. But I wonder if that would impact twitter’s popularity.

    You never know, you may see us added to this list one of these days.

    A tip of the hat to all genuine twitter personalities…

    Ky Ekinci
    Co-Founder
    Office Divvy
    ___________
    on twitter: @OfficeDivvy

    • http://www.justinparks.com Justin Parks

      Good that you have the situation under a close eye Ky. I think that and the fact your aware of where it could lead will see you right in the long run. Fingers crossed for you!

  • Anonymous

    These Twitter “market gurus” that unfollow people are unveiling the truth behind their tactics. Their whole “friendly gesture” of adding people was clearly based solely on numbers—not a means to get to know people, but a means to boost their career. Now that they’ve reached their goal, they are selective.

    Makes sense though; that’s just business. It’s pointless now for them to try and seem all friendly with everyone. The curtain has been drawn and we all understand their purpose on Twitter is business-related. This is just like in real life. People are friends with everyone until they become famous. Once they reach their ideal level of fame, they communicate with a more selective group.

    I’m not saying they’re wrong or bad people. Seems pretty natural in the business world.

  • Anonymous

    These Twitter “market gurus” that unfollow people are unveiling the truth behind their tactics. Their whole “friendly gesture” of adding people was clearly based solely on numbers—not a means to get to know people, but a means to boost their career. Now that they’ve reached their goal, they are selective.

    Makes sense though; that’s just business. It’s pointless now for them to try and seem all friendly with everyone. The curtain has been drawn and we all understand their purpose on Twitter is business-related. This is just like in real life. People are friends with everyone until they become famous. Once they reach their ideal level of fame, they communicate with a more selective group.

    I’m not saying they’re wrong or bad people. Seems pretty natural in the business world.

    • http://www.justinparks.com Justin Parks

      I would have agreed with you on this point gardinal, had it been any other people than the 4 I have mentioned. I have spoke to all of them at one point or the other and appreciate the time they take to reply, even though I know they are busy people in high demand so I wont tar them with this brush.

      I agree though, there are some more unscrupulous, or shall we say “businesslike” people out there who are doing exactly as you describe, though it is getting harder to stand out now as these high follower counts tend to work against them somewhat or single them out as potential scammers/spammers/bots, whereas 6 or 8 months ago this would not have been the case.

  • http://twitter.com/TiaraHotels Tiara Hotels Resorts

    Hi Justin,

    I haven't done anything like this before, preciselly because I “check” my followers list every 15 days. Last time I did it, I've unfollowed at least 200 tweeps.

    My criteria are basicaly the time of the last post , number of posts and interaction with the profile.

    Cheers,

    Nuno Valinhas

  • http://dannybrown.me Danny Brown

    A little bit of me can’t help think that oftentimes it’s user “fault”, as in the user themselves and not the follower. When you use an auto-follow option, you’re opening yourself up to spam. It’s like blindly signing on for any email list that comes your way, not checking if it’s a match for you or not, then complaining when your spam filter doesn’t stop the incoming crap.

    I know Twitter can be noisy and I get as annoyed as anyone when I see spammy tweets. But as far as spammy DM’s go, I very rarely get them because I’ve manually followed from the get-go.

    I like to know who I’m connecting with; I feel you’re doing them a disservice by automatically following everyone back. There are plenty tools around to help you with managing new follows – Topify (http://topify.com) for example is one of the best.

    Worrying about whether you get called a snob or not can be avoided as well. I follow plenty people who don’t follow me back, because I want to learn from their intelligence and smarts. I couldn’t care less if they ever follow me back – I learn from their conversation, and to me that’s what it’s all about.

    Besides, if they’re calling you a snob you probably weren’t a good fit to start with, so no loss there.

    • http://www.justinparks.com Justin Parks

      Yeah Danny, I mentioned the “snob” comment as a “pick a window your leaving” moment as well. What the hell would I want to know someone for if the first thing they did was throw a hissy fit and start name calling.

      Makes you wonder about folks sometimes.

      • http://dannybrown.me Danny Brown

        Twitter does seem to bring it out in folks – they must be the life and soul of the party IRL… ;-)

  • http://www.birdsontheblog.co.uk/ Sarah Arrow

    I have used twitter for 15 months. I don’t know who the pro bloggers are, the celeb marketers, the tech guru’s – I just follow conversations and if it’s interesting (to me) I follow them and if it’s not, nothing personal, I un-follow and walk away.
    As a transport person, I use an auto DM, not to spam but to start a conversation with people who follow me and so they know I am not one of the “pro’s”, just an ordinary person.

    And that’s the problem for some people, they forget that ordinary people are the followers, that the other “pro’s” act differently and follow a “twittiquette” they feel (from my observations) that to use an auto DM is bad form, yet if they used it to tell their followers how they expect them to behave… would the outcome be different?

    I am all for leading by example when it comes to the new things, but the unfollowing thing (to a civillian like me) sounds very much like a celeb falling out of a nightclub drunk and then moaning they have been photographed…

    All things said and done, I enjoy twitter, I follow some of the people commenting in this blog, I follow far more ordinary local people than I do the ‘Twitterati’ and I will still use it for conversation rather than broadcasting.

    • http://www.justinparks.com Justin Parks

      Well you see Essex, thats the problem. You seem to have common sense. :) I dont like Auto DMs myself though, for me its like saying hello to someone and have them hold up a business card to your face because they have no time to get personal with you.

      Its a bit of a snub, but then again I have yet to see a decent Auto DM that actually made me think, no worries I can over look that. So many of them just want you to signup for this or that or sound quite… damn, whats the word… automated? :)

      • http://www.birdsontheblog.co.uk/ Sarah Arrow

        Lol, common sense! me! Thanks :)

        Don’t get me started on Business Cards now…

        • http://www.justinparks.com Justin Parks

          :) Ok, Will not mention the busi… ahhh ha! See I nearly mentioned it!

  • http://dannybrown.me Danny Brown

    A little bit of me can't help think that oftentimes it's user “fault”, as in the user themselves and not the follower. When you use an auto-follow option, you're opening yourself up to spam. It's like blindly signing on for any email list that comes your way, not checking if it's a match for you or not, then complaining when your spam filter doesn't stop the incoming crap.

    I know Twitter can be noisy and I get as annoyed as anyone when I see spammy tweets. But as far as spammy DM's go, I very rarely get them because I've manually followed from the get-go.

    I like to know who I'm connecting with; I feel you're doing them a disservice by automatically following everyone back. There are plenty tools around to help you with managing new follows – Topify (http://topify.com) for example is one of the best.

    Worrying about whether you get called a snob or not can be avoided as well. I follow plenty people who don't follow me back, because I want to learn from their intelligence and smarts. I couldn't care less if they ever follow me back – I learn from their conversation, and to me that's what it's all about.

  • Essex_courier

    I have used twitter for 15 months. I don't know who the pro bloggers are, the celeb marketers, the tech guru's – I just follow conversations and if it's interesting (to me) I follow them and if it's not, nothing personal, I un-follow and walk away.
    As a transport person, I use an auto DM, not to spam but to start a conversation with people who follow me and so they know I am not one of the “pro's”, just an ordinary person.

    And that's the problem for some people, they forget that ordinary people are the followers, that the other “pro's” act differently and follow a “twittiquette” they feel (from my observations) that to use an auto DM is bad form, yet if they used it to tell their followers how they expect them to behave… would the outcome be different?

    I am all for leading by example when it comes to the new things, but the unfollowing thing (to a civillian like me) sounds very much like a celeb falling out of a nightclub drunk and then moaning they have been photographed…

    All things said and done, I enjoy twitter, I follow some of the people commenting in this blog, I follow far more ordinary local people than I do the 'Twitterati' and I will still use it for conversation rather than broadcasting.

  • http://issya.jasonism.org/ issya

    Have to put my 2 cents in on this one. I know each of the big social media marketers must of had some reason for following these people in the first place. How many people knew about them before twitter? I would have to guess that they started following everyone just to get the big numbers. In which they can sell more of their brand/product. It would be pretty hard to sell social media services if you can’t prove you know how to do it yourself.

    Some people decide to start 2 or more twitter accounts. One to interact with people on a personal level and one for their business. That could be a problem if you are your brand.

    Is it fair for marketers and the like to build a huge follower base on twitter, become well known and then unfollow everyone just because they want to interact on a personal level? I think it is a choice they made in the beginning and they should stick with it.

    • http://www.justinparks.com Justin Parks

      I cant speak for everyone here but I think that most of the guys mentioned in the post initially felt obliged to make an effort and try to connect with followers.

      They where already established online or in the fields so their accounts grew rapidly until it hit break point where the functionality and effort required to make the communication work was just to much and all suffered. But that just my opinion on it at this stage.

      If people do decide to do a mass unfollow though it is up to them and they will suffer consequences but again, these guys have all been transparent in the reasons and if they haven’t made the decision already they are struggling with the best course of action to take, and I can and will say this, it will not be about themselves, they will be thinking about what’s best for their followers. I truly believe this.

  • http://issya.jasonism.org/ issya

    Have to put my 2 cents in on this one. I know each of the big social media marketers must of had some reason for following these people in the first place. How many people knew about them before twitter? I would have to guess that they started following everyone just to get the big numbers. In which they can sell more of their brand/product. It would be pretty hard to sell social media services if you can't prove you know how to do it yourself.

    Some people decide to start 2 or more twitter accounts. One to interact with people on a personal level and one for their business. That could be a problem if you are your brand.

    Is it fair for marketers and the like to build a huge follower base on twitter, become well known and then unfollow everyone just because they want to interact on a personal level? I think it is a choice they made in the beginning and they should stick with it.

  • http://www.justinparks.com justinparks

    Again its the old bug bear of spam that seems to be the root of the problem here when we boil it down to the nitty gritty. Im not sure if we can ever get rid of it entirely (dear god I wish) but I would hope that we can make it harder for it to happen, or at least twitter could.

    The DMs about stupid stuff are annoying. I get them to and usually let the DMer know that its a bit crap, sometimes they dont even realise that its happened and usually the put a stop to it right away, probably becasue they have been on the receiving end themselves of something that operates in the same fashion.

    They are a pet hate of mine as well though and really there's not an excuse for them, what the hell do I want the “open my egg and get a gift” crap for and why would I want to send you one back, do you seriously want me to?

  • http://www.justinparks.com justinparks

    I see the logic here but I like having the one account. Of course this problem I posted about hasnt affected me really, or at least, not to the same extent as those mentioned but I would think that having more than one account is just adding extra work for alot of people unless its essential.

    I would guess I would find myself boucning between mutliple accounts and end up pulling my hair out.

  • http://www.justinparks.com justinparks

    Im with ya there.

  • http://www.justinparks.com justinparks

    Im in the same boat, or have been Gsp. I manually follow back and the admin is really time consuming to the point that Im weeks behind.

    Im not sure if people are following me now then when I do not follow back immediately they are also unfollowing, and Im not to bothered to be honest. If they cant stick around, @ me a few times and say hello, we it would have been pointless me following them in the first place and opening the door to the potential DM spam.

  • http://www.justinparks.com justinparks

    Glad that worked out for you Chris.

  • http://www.justinparks.com justinparks

    Your right, twitters not a magical utopia. For me the block and unfollow are there for a reason. I fight every urge to use them but sometimes it just has to be done.

  • http://www.justinparks.com justinparks

    Your using it the way you wish and it seems to be working well for you. Kudos Nuno, y perfecto!

  • http://www.justinparks.com justinparks

    I like that list, its REAL.

  • http://www.justinparks.com justinparks

    Good that you have the situation under a close eye Ky. I think that and the fact your aware of where it could lead will see you right in the long run. Fingers crossed for you!

  • http://www.justinparks.com justinparks

    I would have agreed with you on this point gardinal, had it been any other people than the 4 I have mentioned. I have spoke to all of them at one point or the other and appreciate the time they take to reply, even though I know they are busy people in high demand so I wont tar them with this brush.

    I agree though, there are some more unscrupulous, or shall we say “businesslike” people out there who are doing exactly as you describe, though it is getting harder to stand out now as these high follower counts tend to work against them somewhat or single them out as potential scammers/spammers/bots, whereas 6 or 8 months ago this would not have been the case.

  • http://www.justinparks.com justinparks

    Yeah Danny, I mentioned the “snob” comment as a “pick a window your leaving” moment as well. What the hell would I want to know someone for if the first thing they did was throw a hissy fit and start name calling.

    Makes you wonder about folks sometimes.

  • http://www.justinparks.com justinparks

    Well you see Essex, thats the problem. You seem to have common sense. :) I dont like Auto DMs myself though, for me its like saying hello to someone and have them hold up a business card to your face because they have no time to get personal with you.

    Its a bit of a snub, but then again I have yet to see a decent Auto DM that actually made me think, no worries I can over look that. So many of them just want you to signup for this or that or sound quite… damn, whats the word… automated? :)

  • http://www.justinparks.com justinparks

    I cant speak for everyone here but I think that most of the guys mentioned in the post initially felt obliged to make an effort and try to connect with followers.

    They where already established online or in the fields so their accounts grew rapidly until it hit break point where the functionality and effort required to make the communication work was just to much and all suffered. But that just my opinion on it at this stage.

    If people do decide to do a mass unfollow though it is up to them and they will suffer consequences but again, these guys have all been transparent in the reasons and if they haven't made the decision already they are struggling with the best course of action to take, and I can and will say this, it will not be about themselves, they will be thinking about what's best for their followers. I truly believe this.

  • http://dannybrown.me Danny Brown

    Twitter does seem to bring it out in folks – they must be the life and soul of the party IRL… ;-)

  • Essex_courier

    Lol, common sense! me! Thanks :)

    Don't get me started on Business Cards now…

  • http://www.justinparks.com justinparks

    :) Ok, Will not mention the busi… ahhh ha! See I nearly mentioned it!

  • http://www.justinparks.com justinparks

    :) Ok, Will not mention the busi… ahhh ha! See I nearly mentioned it!

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  • http://codingrelic.geekhold.com DGentry

    FYI, there is one lingering aftereffect of mass-unfollowing everyone: Twitter keeps some state around that you once followed that person. If you follow them again you appear down in the middle of their followers list where you were originally, not at the top where a new follower would normally appear. This can cause some consternation, the person will be notified that you followed but it will look like you unfollowed _again_. “Follow but immediately unfollow” is a bit more personal than mass-unfollowing.

    More details here: http://jetsam.geekhold.com/inconsistent-twitter-follower-sort-ordering-n

    I suspect Twitter does this deliberately. If unfollow+follow moved you to the top of the followers list, the bots would all do it to try to get more people to follow back. Bots are enough of a problem already, without letting them completely take over the service.

  • http://codingrelic.geekhold.com DGentry

    FYI, there is one lingering aftereffect of mass-unfollowing everyone: Twitter keeps some state around that you once followed that person. If you follow them again you appear down in the middle of their followers list where you were originally, not at the top where a new follower would normally appear. This can cause some consternation, the person will be notified that you followed but it will look like you unfollowed _again_. “Follow but immediately unfollow” is a bit more personal than mass-unfollowing.

    More details here: http://jetsam.geekhold.com/inconsistent-twitter

    I suspect Twitter does this deliberately. If unfollow+follow moved you to the top of the followers list, the bots would all do it to try to get more people to follow back. Bots are enough of a problem already, without letting them completely take over the service.

  • http://codingrelic.geekhold.com DGentry

    FYI, there is one lingering aftereffect of mass-unfollowing everyone: Twitter keeps some state around that you once followed that person. If you follow them again you appear down in the middle of their followers list where you were originally, not at the top where a new follower would normally appear. This can cause some consternation, the person will be notified that you followed but it will look like you unfollowed _again_. “Follow but immediately unfollow” is a bit more personal than mass-unfollowing.

    More details here: http://jetsam.geekhold.com/inconsistent-twitter

    I suspect Twitter does this deliberately. If unfollow+follow moved you to the top of the followers list, the bots would all do it to try to get more people to follow back. Bots are enough of a problem already, without letting them completely take over the service.

  • http://www.gucciwell.com/ gucciwomensshoes

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  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=520156274 Anonymous

    why ‘follow’ (essentially listen) to anybody you don’t know or care what they have to say? And why allow just anybody to follow you unless you are some Jesus figure talking to the masses. Get a blog, that’s the best way to talk blinding to people who don’t care.

    twitter is shit and has no future. the concepts of listening to and talking with people will remain, twitter will die when everybody in marketing (the only people that use it) move on.

    i deleted my account 18 months ago.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=520156274 Anonymous

    why ‘follow’ (essentially listen) to anybody you don’t know or care what they have to say? And why allow just anybody to follow you unless you are some Jesus figure talking to the masses. Get a blog, that’s the best way to talk blinding to people who don’t care.

    twitter is shit and has no future. the concepts of listening to and talking with people will remain, twitter will die when everybody in marketing (the only people that use it) move on.

    i deleted my account 18 months ago.