How to Google search a users tweets in twitter

I wrote a post a short time back on how to use Google to search for interesting twitter users using a search string.

The full post is called Using Google Search to find interesting Twitter Users and it has full details on how to use the search for bio and location.

I just came across a tweet by @miralize asking if there was a way to search for words and phrases in the twitter users stream and decided I would try a nother variable on that search string as a shot in the dark and see if it worked.  Seems that I got lucky.

If you want to look for specific words or phrases specifically in the twitter users stream, open google and paste this search string into the search bar changing the red text to the words or phrases you want to find:

site:twitter.com/* tweets+what are you looking for

It seems to work. But the results are not exact.

If I change the string to:

site:twitter.com/* tweets+Get in touch with me if you want, happy to see if I can help.

I get this Google search result back.

The results listed are all tweets that have used the words in my search string, however they are truncated and spread out throughout the tweet itself.

So i decided to mess around a little more with the string and found that if I use this variable:

site:twitter.com/* tweets“Get in touch with me if you want, happy to see if I can help.”

I get the exact match on the phrase I am searching for.  All that was required was the removal of the + sign and the inclusion of the ” marks around the full term, as you can see above.

Might come in useful if you know someone said something a while back and you want to try and find that information again.

*Update*

Updated in a second post on how to apply date range search to tweets via a simple process.  Could be used to monitor a brand name, personal name or subject at a given time.  Hope it comes in useful.

Monitoring tweets about your brand with Google

  • http://www.justinparks.com Justin Parks

    If anyone has any problems with this let me know or if you want to go further I can and will investigate happily.

  • http://www.justinparks.com justinparks

    If anyone has any problems with this let me know or if you want to go further I can and happily will investigate!

  • http://www.VoteRobAlexander.com/ Rob Alexander

    It appears you can also use the following strings:

    site:twitter.com/*/status what are you looking for

    OR

    site:twitter.com/*/status “what are you looking for”

    For example, to search my tweets for the word liberty, you can use the following string:

    site:twitter.com/RobAlexander/status liberty

  • http://www.VoteRobAlexander.com/ Rob Alexander

    It appears you can also use the following strings:

    site:twitter.com/*/status what are you looking for

    OR

    site:twitter.com/*/status “what are you looking for”

    For example, to search my tweets for the word liberty, you can use the following string:

    site:twitter.com/RobAlexander/status liberty

  • http://www.VoteRobAlexander.com/ Rob Alexander

    It appears you can also use the following strings:

    site:twitter.com/*/status what are you looking for

    OR

    site:twitter.com/*/status “what are you looking for”

    For example, to search my tweets for the word liberty, you can use the following string:

    site:twitter.com/RobAlexander/status liberty

  • Anonymous

    Interestingly I found a different method that I see as being more accurate, using both of the above ideas as a base.

    In Justin’s example when I search for my brand term (“coffeemarketing”) using this search phrase;

    site:twitter.com/* tweets“coffeemarketing”

    I receive 33 results. Unfortunately some of these seeemed to just be picking up the term “tweet” as in latter results I couldn’t find the term “coffeemarketing”

    Using Rob Alexander’s example;

    site:twitter.com/*/status “coffeemarketing”

    I receive 1 result (I think due to the fact that some brand results will come from replies and for me that is a valid brand mention in the public timeline)

    However I had a play myself and found that simply

    site:twitter.com/* “coffeemarketing”

    seemed to work the best and delivered results that were exactly what I was looking for, dealt with different update scenarios and the exact brand term.

    Hope this is helpful!

    @coffeemarketing

  • http://www.justinparks.com Justin Parks

    Interesting one @coffeemarketing, I checked this out and I think its because the term, all one word “coffeemarketing” wont really appear in peoples tweets because its not said in normal conversation as a single word so the string with he “tweet” prefix wont really give many results.

    I did some messing with it and to be honest, there is no right way, you took it and made it work for you so Success!

    You could also give this a try for a different set of results which might be interesting:

    site:twitter.com/* name“coffeemarketing”

  • coffeemarketing

    Interestingly I found a different method that I see as being more accurate, using both of the above ideas as a base.

    In Justin's example when I search for my brand term (“coffeemarketing”) using this search phrase;

    site:twitter.com/* tweets“coffeemarketing”

    I receive 33 results. Unfortunately some of these seeemed to just be picking up the term “tweet” as in latter results I couldn't find the term “coffeemarketing”

    Using Rob Alexander's example;

    site:twitter.com/*/status “coffeemarketing”

    I receive 1 result (I think due to the fact that some brand results will come from replies and for me that is a valid brand mention in the public timeline)

    However I had a play myself and found that simply

    site:twitter.com/* “coffeemarketing”

    seemed to work the best and delivered results that were exactly what I was looking for, dealt with different update scenarios and the exact brand term.

    Hope this is helpful!

  • http://www.justinparks.com Justin Parks

    Interesting one @coffeemarketing, I checked this out and I think its because the term, all one word “coffeemarketing” wont really appear in peoples tweets because its not said in normal conversation as a single word so the string with he “tweet” prefix wont really give many results.

    I did some messing with it and to be honest, there is no right way, you took it and made it work for you so Success!

    You could also give this a try for a different set of results which might be interesting:

    site:twitter.com/* name“coffeemarketing”

  • http://twitter.com/coffeemarketing Alistair Williams

    Hi Justin,

    Yes as you say it is a case of making it work for your brand, as often generic words need different filters to more quirky brand names. I like your additional solution, as well and can certainly see a tool being developed that “picks up brand mentions” on twitter, with a few of these filtering options.

  • http://twitter.com/coffeemarketing Alistair Williams

    Hi Justin,

    Yes as you say it is a case of making it work for your bradn, as often generic words need different filters to more quirky brand names. I like your additional solution, as well and can certainly see a tool being developed that “picks up brand mentions” on twitter, with a few of these filtering options.

  • http://twitter.com/coffeemarketing Alistair Williams

    Hi Justin,

    Yes as you say it is a case of making it work for your brand, as often generic words need different filters to more quirky brand names. I like your additional solution, as well and can certainly see a tool being developed that “picks up brand mentions” on twitter, with a few of these filtering options.